Monday, July 1, 2013

Top Ten Tuesday: Intimidating Books

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.

Top Ten Most Intimidating Books (because of size, content, pressure to like them, etc.) All covers courtesy of goodreads.com unless otherwise posted.

This is a fun question for me because I'm not one who's ever been afraid of large, hard to read books. (I love Wheel of Time, remember? A Memory of Light just came out this past January. It's gargantuan but I dove right in without a care.) I've read the Old Testament cover to cover and just last year read the unabridged version of Les Miserables, though I'll admit to skimming over historical sections. But, that's not to say there aren't books that I haven't put off reading.

6. Old Historical Books by various authors--I have lots of history books, especially about different aspects of the Middle Ages. It's an area of interest for me and I want to read them for research purposes. That said, most of them are non-fiction, and written long enough ago that they tend to drag. As I come closer to writing my next medieval historical piece, I'll probably pick a few of them up, but I definitely put them off in favor of easy, flowing fiction.


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5. The Fatal Shore by Robert Hughes--I've wanted to read this for a long time because I'm interested in how Australia was colonized (originally it was an isle of madmen) but it's really thick and a non-fiction/history textbook-type to boot, so I keep putting it off.


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4. The Prelude to Glory series by Ron Carter. I actually read the first two books years ago, when they were the only volumes out, and really loved them. Since then, there's six or seven more in the series, but I haven't gone back to read them because they're so long and would mean a lot of hours of reading, just to finish the series. I'm developing a habit of reading an entire series in only a month or so (1-2 books/week) and I'll probably end up doing that with this series, though not until at least next year.


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3. Moby Dick by Herman Melville--I've actually read a short story or two by Melville, so I know how difficult his style can be and how obscure some of his references. I really want to read this classic, but again, it's just time and brain cells.


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2. Books by Alexander Dumas--I really want to read some of Dumas' work, simply because I never had before. I'd especially like to find out the ending of the original Man in the Iron Mask, but his books are quite long and would require a time commitment. I've never been afraid of that before, but I'm doing a lot of work now and it would mean not getting other things done, so I hesitate. 


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1. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy--especially after reading Anna Karenina, and knowing how difficult Tolstoy's writing style is to wade through, I've hesitated to read this tome. I've actually picked it up a time or two, but have always given up. The prose is choppy and hard to follow, which I think may be a translation problem. I want to look into finding a better translation before I pick it up again. I think it's a year-long project. Just a little each day until you get through it, you know? Maybe next year. :D


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That's all I can think of. What about you? What books intimidate you?

13 comments :

  1. I read War and Peace. It was a snorefest personally but I know some people enjoyed it. Great list.

    Tsuki's TTT

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  2. Dumas is actually quite nice! But I've read him in French... I have no idea how the translations are.

    It's interesting that you're not intimidated by huge books! I know I can be :)

    Here's my TTT post for this week. Happy reading Liesel.

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  3. Wow, terrifying list! I get it in my head at times that I should read more classics, and then I'm like, aaaah, I think I'm better off reading whatever I like, haha

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  4. Great list! I soooooo relate! (And I hated Moby Dick, so I wouldn't blame you if you shelved that ambition entirely.)

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  5. War and Peace is on my list too. Just the name Leo Tolstoy intimidates me!Great list!

    MY TTT: http://www.bookythoughtsandme.com/top-ten-most-intimidating-books/

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  6. A lot of classics are really intimidating. A few nearly made my list!

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  7. I listened to Moby Dick. War and Peace was fun for me - but maybe that was the translation. My memory of it is positive, but I needed a cheat sheet for the names (so many nicknames for the characters) and to me it was a romance more than anything else. Anna Karenina was not a favorite. I don't particularly care for Romeo & Juliet either. That whole "I can't live without him" train of thought drives me insane. I enjoyed Dumas. You have some titles I haven't heard of though. Fun list.

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  8. I have a few Dumas books on my shelf as well but have yet to dig in to them. I'm hoping to get around to them soon though because his ideas seem really interesting! Also, I feel like a lot of Russian literature is a bit intimidating just because they have a reputation for being involved with lots happening, and a very unique writing style.

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  9. History books are good for research but oh, so boring! I have some problems with classics too. I do want to read them but usually the writing style is not for me.

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  10. I really enjoyed The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Although it was over a thousand pages, it didn't feel like it. Maybe also because I read the ebook.

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  11. Anyone ever tried to read anything by TS Elliot? I tried (The Waste Land) in a college English class and barely got through it. My final grade (I'm not telling) reflected my struggle with the reading. Although, back then, football players got special treatment. Don't worry. It's just the opposite of what you might think. My English professor thought football players where dysfunctional idiots.

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  12. I think War and Peace made most lists today. I don't anyone who's actually read it. I totally agree with Moby Dick, too. It just sounds so boring to me. Great list! Thanks for stopping by mine!
    -Natalie @Natflix&Books

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